From Sue is a bi-weekly blog thought written by our Executive Presbyter, Rev. Susan D. Krummel, Sue, and published in our e-newsletter, Presbytery Connect.
 

View Your Building Through a Visitor’s Eyes

There are so many churches in the Chicago area that were started by the Greatest Generation when they came back from World War II. They arrived home with a new resolve to expand their horizons; the GI Bill gave people who would never have been able to afford to go to college the chance to do so; transportation was changing so it was possible to move out of the city but still be employed there. Those men and women gathered like-minded people and started congregations all around the perimeter of the city and beyond. They built nice, new buildings for their church and filled them with their children and the children in the neighborhood and their friends and family.
 
Now, 75 years later, many of those buildings still look pretty much the same as they did when they were built, except shabbier. Those buildings and their long-delayed maintenance are one of the reasons that churches are closing. They cannot afford to make it safe, let alone bring it up to code. If you still have money and energy and your building needs help, don’t put it off.
 
As I visit with sessions of congregations that are thinking about closing, I realize they do not see what a visitor sees. It is like the characteristic smell of your own home, usually a mixture of the food you cook, the pets you have, the detergent you use, and the cologne you wear. You don’t notice it when you walk in, but visitors do.
 

Imagine approaching your church building as a visitor. Here are some of the things I notice.

  • What door should I enter? Many churches have multiple doors and the one that the architect originally intended as the “front door” is not the way most members enter. I have sometimes sat in my car outside of a church on a Sunday morning until I see someone walk in because I have too many times tried two or three doors before I find the right one.
  • What does the outside of the building look like? Does it seem like it is abandoned when you look at the paint or the roof or the state of repair of the sidewalk? If there is landscaping, is it maintained? I once walked up to a church that clearly had planted gardens around the building at one time. (Remember, I am a gardener.) They looked like they had not been maintained for years. A few scraggly perennials were doing their best to grow, but the beds were overgrown with weeds. It was all I could do not to pull a few of them. It would be better to take out the gardens and plant grass that can be mowed than to leave these symbols of neglect.
  • What are the bathrooms like? In many smaller churches, most of the members live close enough and are there for a short enough time that they never use them. I have lost count of the number of times when I have gone into a kind of scary, dark ladies’ room only to find a little sign by the toilet that gives me instructions about how to flush. ‘Hold the handle down and count to 10; wait five seconds; flush again quickly,” or something like that. If you need to give this kind of instructions for this basic task, call a plumber!
  • Are there stacks of dusty old books, curriculum, etc. in the corners of the sanctuary and the hallways? Are there announcements pinned to a bulletin board about events that happened months ago? Does it look like this is a living organization or one that is dying?
Imagine a family looking for a church as the new school year starts, a time when some families decide they are going to get their schedules organized and might add church into it. What will they see when they approach your building? The number of people they see when they come into your sanctuary may not be as important as the impression they have already formed in the time it took them to approach your building from their car or train or bus. Our buildings should reflect our call, not to glorify the history of our congregation, but to bring hope to all whose lives we touch in the name of Jesus.
 
Susan D. Krummel (Sue)
Executive Presbyter
(312) 488-3015
skrummel@chicagopresbytery.org

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Another Mass Shooting

Another mass shooting. Two, in fact, in less than 24 hours. Some news reports say that we are now past the 250 mark for mass shootings this year in the United States. Sadly, it almost doesn’t matter when this note makes it into the Connect. There will be a mass shooting again whether at a school, church, mall, synagogue, entertainment district – anywhere that people congregate.

Guns are too available and too deadly. That seems clear, but it is a topic on which politicians and others will get stuck and then stuck again after the next mass shooting. Guns have always been available in this country, but this phenomenon of mass shootings is new. That is to say nothing of the slow motion mass shooting that occurs every day in Chicago and other cities. Something has changed in the 21st Century.

 What causes these young men to become so desperate or so enraged or so fame-seeking that they walk into a school room which is, often, filled with other students they have known since kindergarten and open fire? What causes them to drive nine hours to shoot people who are different from them and whom they have been told by our leaders are a threat to them? What causes them to dress for battle and then kill strangers and relatives alike? Have they been desensitized to violence by the world around them and by the world created before their eyes on their screens? Have they been abandoned by families who are so busy trying to stay afloat financially or who are distracted by their own demons that they do not notice that their sons are on the edge? Have they been drugged since early childhood in a society that turns to pharmaceuticals to solve problems?  What gives their own lives so little meaning that they are willing to lose it in a hail of police bullets or lose it by spending most of the rest of it prison? And, why do they have access to weapons that were made for use by trained soldiers on a field of battle?

We may not be able to agree on answers to any of those questions. But on what could we agree? Does the gospel have anything to offer these young men and boys? Can we find a way to communicate it so that it is heard and believed? Do we believe that the church can help to provide meaning in all of our lives in a way that nothing else can? Are we willing to find out what is happening for boys and young men in our society by creating safe spaces in which they express their fears and sadness?

If we are called to do anything as a church, we are called to bring hope in the name of Jesus Christ, every hour of every day. That works for us in circumstances that seem predictable and about which we are familiar—sending food to a food pantry; collecting clothes for those who need them; conducting worship on Sunday morning. What about the unfamiliar? Are we able to bring the impact of the gospel into spaces where people are told that anyone who is different from them should be “sent home” or, worse yet, eliminated? Are we willing to advocate for a safer environment when it comes to the use of weapons, even if that advocacy makes us unpopular? Can we step into the unfamiliar and share the love of God which gives our lives meaning and hope?
 
Susan D. Krummel (Sue)
Executive Presbyter
Presbytery of Chicago
312.488.3015
skrummel@chicagopresbytery.org

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But We’ve Always Done it That Way

I have had the privilege of sitting in on the meetings between members of the Commission on Ministry and the Mission Team with sessions that are requesting Salary Supplement funds. As you may recall, the presbytery voted to begin using funds from two sources in order to provide salary supplements to small churches with limited funds of their own. The application period has now closed for 2020 and seven congregations made application. There is a three page document that becomes the basis of the meeting to discover more about the congregations and to see if they qualify for this grant. It has been a privilege because we get to hear so many good things about the mission and ministry of these congregations. Some of them average 40 or 50 people in worship but their impact on their communities goes far beyond what you might imagine a small group could do. They host people without secure housing; they feed people with fresh food; they work with children from nearby schools who need time with caring adults and so on. I heard something in one of the visits that sounds like such a good idea that I wanted to pass it along. At the Presbyterian Church in Palatine, they have seasonal teams instead of standing committees. On their pledge Sunday each year, they have sign-up sheets for people to use to volunteer to serve on one or more seasonal teams. Each team has about five members. For instance, you might sign up for the Advent team. That team meets with the pastor and musician about eight weeks before the season begins. They spend time on the lectionary readings for that season and look for a theme. They then build everything that will happen in the congregation during that season around that theme: education, social events, mission projects, worship. One individual can sign up for two seasons in a row if they choose, but then they must take a break for at least one season. What a great idea! Imagine being a member of that church and looking at your calendar for the whole year. You realize that you will have the time and energy to serve during the summer and from January until Lent, for instance, but not to sit on a committee that meets every month whether they need to or not. Imagine the new ideas that can be generated when you have a new group of people handling these aspects of a church’s life. There is less of the “we have always done it this way” approach to the church year. Just imagine using the lectionary readings as the basis of your decisions instead of thinking that it is February so you must serve something with cherries, or it is the second Sunday of September so you must serve the same hotdogs at the Sunday School kick off that you have always served!

The pastor at Palatine, RJ Kang, and the session there would be happy to talk with you about how this works. I wondered with them about how they convinced the people who have run a certain committee since before the Ark was built to give up their hold on that work. They admitted it was a little bit of a struggle at first but now the church loves doing things this way. Just imagine how your congregation might work if you set aside the ways you have always done things, listened closely for God’s guidance, and set out on a new adventure to bring hope in the name of Jesus!
 
Susan D. Krummel (Sue)
Executive Presbyter
Presbytery of Chicago
312-488-3015

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Customer Service

I had a very interesting few days in the middle of June.
 
First, I was stuck for 25 minutes in the elevator in the building where I live in Chicago.
 
Then, as my husband and I were returning from a very quick trip to Kansas City to see some seminary friends, I hit something and blew a tire.
 
Third (I guess bad things always come in threes) a deer ran into the side of my car while I was driving from Peoria to Chicago on two lane roads. The deer got the worst of the encounter.
 
All three of these incidents gave me a chance to think about customer service, both good and bad. For instance, in all three situations, when I first communicated with someone who was supposed to help (the woman who answered the elevator phone; AAA for roadside assistance; and my insurance company) early in the conversation I was asked if I was okay. Thankfully, the answer was always yes. (Although the elevator incident went on just long enough for me to begin to wonder about how much oxygen there actually is in an elevator. . . .)
 
Here is what I learned in the elevator incident, a fact which I communicated in fairly strong terms to the young people who run the building during the day when I finally arrived in the lobby. When someone is stuck in an elevator, an employee should stand outside of the elevator in order to communicate with the trapped person until the elevator doors open. (I had no cell phone service in the elevator.)
 
Here is what I learned in the flat tire incident. I drove on the flat for a very short distance to a gas station. While I was on the phone with AAA, a man walked up and handed me his card. He was from the Honda dealership nearby and was at the station getting snacks for his crew. He offered to send a technician over to put our spare on and then work us in to get a new tire. He had a lot of initiative to notice the flat, see that it was on a Honda, and make this very kind offer.
 
Here is what I learned from the deer incident. It pays to be a member of a family whose business returns lots of business to the insurance company every year, and to have been in church youth group with the president of the insurance company. Actually, I don’t know if those two things moved me up in the line, but I got a very prompt phone call from the carrier itself.
 
What can our congregations learn from this? Maybe the following: when someone is in distress, offer to be with them in whatever manner will be most comforting to them. Is that sitting in the hospital waiting room with them? Is that taking over some food to the house? Is that making phone calls to people who need to be informed of a death? Ask them what they need in detail and then, to the best of your ability, provide it.
 
Second, when you see a need that you know that your church can address, be bold enough to offer assistance. Do you have room in the basement for people without reliable shelter to sleep? Can you change the time of your worship service so that people who have to work on Sunday morning can attend? Are there children in the nearby school who need tutors? Offer your services.
 
Third, when you are the party whose job it is to offer help, do so promptly. Has someone called to arrange for a wedding? Are there children who need to be registered for VBS? Has the local food pantry taken you up on your offer for fresh food? Don’t make them wait. Instead, treat them like their family for three generations has helped make your business grow. Remember in all of these situations you are one of the ways that they will know that they can always find hope in the name of Jesus Christ.
 

Susan D. Krummel (Sue)
Executive Presbyter
Presbytery of Chicago
312-488-3015


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Adjusting and Accommodating

I saw the new “live action” movie version of Disney’s Aladdin recently. This is probably about the twenty-fifth (at least) time that I have seen this story portrayed either on stage or screen. My children were the right age for the original animated version. I imagine we saw it in a movie theater, but mostly I remember watching it on our TV at home through the auspices of our trusty VCR and the VHS tape. As it happens, we still have that VHS tape and we still have a VCR connected to our TV. (The DVD part of the device no longer works, but I don’t want to get rid of it because I don’t think we could find another VCR!) That means that our grandchildren have also enjoyed the movie that their mothers loved. And when I say “enjoyed” I mean that they kind of watched it on a loop when they were younger. Three of our grandchildren and my husband and I have also seen the stage musical here in Chicago. All of that is to say that I know the lyrics to the songs; boy, do I know the lyrics to the songs!
 

So when I was sitting in the theater, I immediately spotted one of the changes made in the 2019 version. Perhaps you know the Disney version of this story, too. If so, then you know there is a big production number when Aladdin, who has been turned into Prince Ali by the genie, makes his “royal” entrance into the city where the princess whom he seeks lives. The genie sings the number, introducing this new arrival into the succession of marriageable men seeking the princess’s hand. (This is a very common theme in Disney movies, along with the required dead parent.) I was kind of singing along in my head in the theater and we got to the part of the song that used to be “Brush up your Sunday salaam.”
 

The whole song is about preparing to meet the princess. As a part of that, one is admonished to get ready to give your best greeting. In the 2019 version, the words have been changed to “Brush up your Friday salaam.” Nice. Someone realized that putting on your “Sunday best” is a Christian concept. They changed it to make it more culturally sensitive. Or at least to make it more cognizant of the fact that in this fictional Eastern realm, Sunday might have been replaced by Friday as the time to put on your best and do your best.
 

I imagine that there are some people who think that is silly. It is a made up song about a made up place. Some might dismiss it as being merely politically correct. But what is wrong with noticing the differences among us and making an effort to be more inclusive and sensitive to those differences?
 

As our congregations continue to adjust to the way the world is in 2019, we need to be as observant as the people who reviewed those 1990’s lyrics of Aladdin and realized they should make some changes. What have you noticed about your neighbors that would lead you to change something in the way your congregation carries out its ministry? What small adjustments could you make to be more accommodating? How might you change so that the way you share the gospel is not a hindrance to that gospel? After all, the heart of our call is to share hope in the name of Jesus, not to do so in exactly the same way we have always done.
 

Susan D. Krummel (Sue)
Executive Presbyter
Presbytery of Chicago
312-488-3015


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What Does it Mean to Have Privilege?

Perhaps you have heard the phrase “white privilege” in recent years. Here is one definition: “The societal privilege that benefits people whom society identifies as white in some countries, beyond what is commonly experienced by non-white people under the same social, political, or economic circumstances.” (Wikipedia)

Even that definition is an example of white privilege since everyone who is not perceived as white is seen as the opposite; it makes “whiteness” the standard. Maybe we could use the term “people of color.” In the United States, we may soon be able to use the term “the majority of people.” Or perhaps another way to think about it is that white people are seldom defined by their race. They are just a doctor or a lawyer or a teacher, not an “African-American doctor” or an “Asian lawyer” or a “Latinx teacher.” I have had two experiences recently that reminded me of my privilege, both because I am perceived of as white and because I am perceived of as old.

I live very close to the presbytery office in the West Loop. That means I walk on the sidewalks in this neighborhood frequently. There are people of all races and lots of ages on these sidewalks, although I think this neighborhood trends more diverse and younger than some. The University of Illinois at Chicago campus is very close to us and there are always lots of students around.

Usually when I walk around here, I am pretty invisible. I am not young enough to attract the attention of people who might be romantically or sexually interested in me. And I am both female and white so am not seen as threat by most people. Of course, I do still have credit cards, a phone, and some cash with me and I am a woman, so I might be seen as a target by someone who wanted to cause me harm; but my status as an old white woman may protect me from threat. I walk down the street most of the time without attracting much attention at all.

A few months ago, I was leaving the building where I used to live, which is about five blocks from the office, at the same time that the night doorman was leaving the building. He was walking to the CTA Blue Line near the office so we walked those blocks together. We were talking about his grandchildren and about my grandchildren as we walked down the street.

After a block or so, I noticed that I was no longer as anonymous as I usually am. I had lost the privilege of not being seen. The person who worked in the building where I lived was black and male. Almost every white person we passed look directly into my face—they never looked at me before—to be sure that I was all right. It reminded me to a very, very small degree the difference between this gentleman’s walk down the street and mine.

Then one of my grand-daughters came to stay with me during her spring break. She is eleven and about five feet tall with very blonde hair which she had up on top of her head, making her look taller. She and I went for a little walk in the neighborhood. I was suddenly reminded what it is like to walk with a young girl/woman, to see through her eyes a world full of people who are interested in her in inappropriate ways. I kept seeing men’s heads turn to follow our path in a way they never look at me when I am alone. It brought to mind, again, the privilege I have of walking through the street unnoticed and unthreatened.

White privilege means we see people like us on TV in the starring roles, find personal care products in the store that cater to the needs of our skin and hair types and, perhaps more importantly, that we can walk into a store or down the street without attracting undue attention. We can spend much of our lives either in the zone of not being seen as presenting a threat to those with whom we might be walking; or not being the object of unwanted surveillance.

We all seek to discern God’s will for our ministry in this country in this century. The issues of privilege and racism need to be a part of that discernment as we work to bring hope to all people in the name of Jesus Christ.

Susan D. Krummel (Sue)
Executive Presbyter
Presbytery of Chicago
312-488-3015


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Confirmation Examinations

I took a week of vacation during Holy Week. It gave me the chance to be part of a special event for my older grandson. On that Tuesday evening, he and the other confirmands at his church in Iowa met with the session to complete their confirmation process. It was one of those nights when my daughter and her husband could not get everyone where they needed to be on time, so I got to help.
 

I went to a junior high track meet to see my grandson run a long relay race. Then I was part of his conversation with his coach about when to leave since we could not stay for the whole meet and get to the church on time. The coach already knew that my grandson had to leave, but was not too gracious about the fact. We barely had time to get home for him to get a shower and review the questions in his confirmation notebook. Then it was off to church for a potluck dinner provided by the session. Each student had a mentor who was there as well. My grandson was nervous about having to answer questions in front of the session. I told him that nobody flunks this meeting. He had attended confirmation class regularly and the session members want him and the others to join the church.
 

I told him about my memories of this night in my life. I went to a big downtown Presbyterian church and I am a baby boomer. There were several dozen in my confirmation class. In Sunday School for the previous eight years, we were required to memorize a Bible verse each year. So we all “knew” these eight Bible verses that we had memorized together. I was afraid we would be quizzed on all of those. Instead, they just lined us all up and asked one question of each of us. No problem.
 

My grandson and I got to the church. Each confirmand was to sit at a table with their invited guests, their mentor, and other session members. Since my granddaughters were still being ferried around to their various events, this meant that my grandson was the only young person at his table. He tried valiantly to enter into the conversation the adults were having, but they were not very good at including him. Then at the appointed time, the pastor stood up and called “these brave young people” forward to face the session. By this time my daughter had arrived and I had a long drive back home, so I excused myself. Before I left I reminded my grandson that he would be fine and that we are proud of him. The way the evening was set up, I would have been nervous to step up and be examined!
 

This experience reminded me of a couple of changes that I made as a pastor to the way that churches traditionally conduct confirmation. At one big church where I was the interim, there were a dozen or so confirmands. Part way through their year of training, I realized this church had the tradition of the confirmands writing a statement of faith. I could see them getting nervous. I told the session that it was fine to have the kids write a statement and that each session member would write one as well. This would be the basis of their discussion when the confirmands came to be examined. After all, why should we expect 13-year-olds to write a statement of faith and not ask the same of the spiritual leaders of the church?
 

The second innovation happened when my husband and I were co-pastors in Burlington, Iowa. My husband still has confirmands engage in this practice where he is pastor now. In the Burlington church, there was a person who loved to sew. Each year we had her make a plain white stole for each confirmand. They were encouraged to decorate it with symbols or words that had meaning to them in their life away from church and in what they learned and experienced at church. In came stoles with soccer balls and musical notes and crosses and words about communion and so on. This stole then became the basis of the examination by session. The confirmands could talk about their whole lives and how their faith and their day to day life intersect.
 

I hope that you have a confirmation class or student in your church this year. I hope that you will be creative about how they have a discussion with the session about what it means to follow Christ in 2019 in North America. I hope that you will also challenge your session members to share their own faith with these new disciples so that, together, you can continue to bring hope in the name of Jesus Christ.
 

Susan D. Krummel (Sue)
Executive Presbyter
Presbytery of Chicago
312-488-3015


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A Parable

I heard a parable some years ago that helps us to reflect on the life of our congregations and all of our ministries. Are our churches and hospitals and schools and social service agencies for the people who are members or are they for the members and for people who need to hear the gospel and to know they are loved by God because they know who Jesus is?  Here is the parable.
 

There was a rocky coastline where there were many shipwrecks. The people who lived on the shore knew how dangerous it was along their coast. A lighthouse was there to warn sailors away, but sometimes the sailors were foolish and sometimes there were storms that smashed the ships of even the wisest and most experienced sailors against the rocks, destroying their ships. People needed to be rescued.
 

The people on the shore decided that they would form a life-saving society. They bought small boats that could be rowed out even in the harshest conditions. They trained to row out and to meet the needs of those whom they had saved. They had a plan for how they would help those who were saved to get back on their feet.
 

All of this training brought the life savers together. They enjoyed one another’s company. They needed a place to meet so they built a clubhouse for themselves. They started to plan regular meetings. They had parties together. They had potluck suppers. The clubhouse needed new curtains and a new floor and it got to be too small so they expanded it. Their regular calendar of events was full. For a while, they still dropped everything and rowed out to sea whenever they saw a ship in trouble. But then it became too much to fit into the schedule of their own training and their parties and their potluck suppers.
 

Shipwrecks still occurred. People still needed to be saved. But the life savers had become a club and they could not set aside their Tuesday night card tournament or their Sunday morning gathering or their Friday night potluck to row out to sea. If shipwrecks happened at a convenient time and in a convenient place, they still tried to get out to sea. But as the years passed, the row boats first sat idle and then were put in a museum to remind the lifesaving club of what they had once been.
 

What did the founders of your church hope to accomplish by starting a church in your neighborhood? What did your non-profit set out to do? Is that original vision still at the heart of your work? Has it evolved into a new vision that still brings the good news into people’s lives? Or has it become a club, more focused on the needs of its members than in bringing hope in the name of Jesus?


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